Sicilian Grilled Pork Chop

on summer peas, mint & pancetta

Using Knorr Chicken Gravy Pots
6
20min
10min

Ingredients

50ml extra-virgin olive oil, plus extra for brushing

3 onions, thinly sliced

1 tbsp currants

1 tbsp red wine vinegar

100g green olives, pitted and coarsely chopped

½ a handful of flat-leaf parsley leaves, finely chopped

45g pine nuts, toasted

6 pork chops (about 350g each)

Peas, Mint & Pancetta

20g butter

1 onion, finely chopped

100g pancetta, cut into batons

350g peas

125ml white wine

250ml Knorr Chicken Gravy Pot

½ bunch of round mint, leaves picked

To serve: lemon halves and local rucola

Method

Heat olive oil in a frying pan over low-medium heat, add onion and a pinch of salt. Stir occasionally until caramelised (10 minutes). Add currants and red wine vinegar, increase heat to medium-high and simmer until the vinegar is reduced (about 1 minute). Stir through the olives, parsley and pine nuts and set aside to cool to room temperature.

Cut a pocket in the side of each pork chop, spoon the onion mixture inside, season to taste, and tie securely with kitchen string.

Meanwhile, for the peas, mint and pancetta, melt the butter in a saucepan over medium-heat, add the onion and pancetta and cook for 5-6 minutes or until soft. Add the peas, stiring to combine, then deglaze with the wine. Add the Knorr Chicken Gravy Pot and cook for 5 minutes or until the peas are soft. Add mint and stir to combine.

Meanwhile, heat a char-grill or barbecue to medium-high heat. Brush the pork chops with olive oil and grill until just cooked through, turning once (4-5 minutes each side). Season to taste, serve with the lemon, rucola and peas.

Cooking tips

Add sauce to your pasta and not the other way around. This helps the pasta mix well with the sauce without overcooking it or risking having the pasta stuck to the bottom of the pot.

Re-heating leftover food? Make sure to cover the food with foil before putting it in the oven to ensure moisture is retained and food is heated all the way through.

When cooking meat, use high heat to develop flavour and low heat to preserve moisture.